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    ARCHIVES >>> 10/2008


29.10.2008 21:00 GMT



Hello and welcome back to another update of Forgotten Hope. Today we have some more renders of allied equipment used in Normandy.

Firstly, we have the M1A1 Thompson sub-machine gun, made by Remdul and Seth Soldier.

The M1A1 Thompson is quite different from the M1928 Thompson used by the British in North Africa. The newer design moved the charging handle to the side of the weapon, replaced the vertical front grip by a horizontal one, removed the muzzle brake and significantly reduced the rate of fire. These changes made the weapon much more reliable, but also cut its production costs in half. Nearly 1.4 million M1 and M1A1 Thompsons were made during World War 2.

Next up is the PIAT made by Toddel.

As more and more powerful tanks rolled onto the battlefield, the need arose for more powerful anti-tank weapons. Whereas the Americans developed their rocket-launcher the Bazooka and the Germans their recoilless gun the Panzerfaust, the British went in yet another direction. Their PIAT (Projector, Infantry, Anti Tank) launched a HEAT projectile using a spring. This method, unlike the Panzerfaust and Bazooka created no smoke at all, however it had some unique problems of its own. When fired the spring would push forward a heavy 5kg ballast, which would then also ignite a small charge on the projectile, pushing the ballast back and locking it into place again, so the spring would not have to be cocked after firing. This system was quite unreliable and often failed to lock the spring back in place. The operator would then have to cock the PIAT manually, which required a force of 900 Newton. The ballast also made the PIAT very heavy. It was first used in the Sicily campaign and remained the primary portable anti-tank weapon for the British throughout the war.

Finally we have the Bangalore Torpedo, also by Toddel.

The Bangalore Torpedo was invented in 1912 by a British Army Captain in Bangalore, India. In World War 2 the US Army adopted the Bangalore Torpedo and the allied forces used it to great success during D-day. The M1A1 Bangalore Torpedo could be deployed from behind cover. It would be build up by connecting multiple 1.5 metre sections to a length of 15 metres. A complete torpedo could clear a path of barbed wire and mines up to 15 metres long and 1 metre wide. Surprisingly, the Bangalore Torpedo is still in use with the US Army to this day.

That's all for this week, but be sure to come back next time for another update. Until then, feel free to visit our IRC channel and our public forums to discuss this update and other news.


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22.10.2008 19:00 GMT



Hello and welcome back to another update of Forgotten Hope. This week we are proud to present the Forgotten Hope 2.15 trailer. This trailer features many (but not all) of the new things we have added in our latest patch. You will see the Tiger tank in action on Mareth Line, the grappling hooks on Giarabub and the tough street fights on Tunis. The 2.15 Trailer was filmed and edited by Bob Sacamano.

View the trailer now, by clicking on the play button above or download the high resolution version from filefront using the link below.

Download the Forgotten Hope 2.15 Trailer from Filefront

That's all for this week, but be sure to come back next time for another update. Until then, feel free to visit our IRC channel and our public forums to discuss this update and other news.


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15.10.2008 21:00 GMT



Hello and welcome back to another update of Forgotten Hope. We have gone without updates for a few weeks now, but we are still working hard to finish the third map for our 2.15 patch. Today though, we have some great new renders for you, but first, we would like to welcome the latest addition to our development team. Kev4000 will be helping us by coding vehicles and weapons. Welcome Kev4000!

The first renders we have for today are of a much requested (primarily by one person) piece of German equipment. I am talking of course about the Lafette Tripod for the MG34 and MG42. This tripod was modeled by McGibs and skinned by Toddel.

The Lafette Tripod created a stable platform for the German MG34 and MG42 machineguns. Not only did this tripod take care of much of the recoil, it was also equipped with a scope for extremely accurate and sustained fire. The tripod (including MG42) weighed as much as 32 kilograms and required 3 to 6 people to move and operate. You can find the MG34 tripod on maps in 2.15 and the MG42 version will be available in Normandy.

Today's second render is of the German Nebelwerfer 41, made by K96.

The Nebelwerfer 41 (fog-launcher in English) fired six 150mm rockets, which each carried an explosive charge comparable to the projectiles of the 105mm howitzers of the time. The six rockets were fired in quick succession by the 4 man crew, which had to take cover from the rocket back blast in a small trench further away. Although a very potent weapon, the Nebelwerfer had a big drawback - the rockets it fired left a large smoke trail in the air, which could be visible from miles away. This meant that the Nebelwerfer batteries could only stay in the same place for a short time after firing, before the enemy artillery would have zeroed in on their position. When the rockets were fired they made a howling pipe-organ sound, which led the allied soldiers to nickname them 'screaming mimis'.

That's all for this week, but be sure to come back next time for another update. Until then, feel free to visit our IRC channel and our public forums to discuss this update and other news.


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